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The Great War in the Heart of Dixie, The Great War in the Heart of Dixie, 0817316167, 0-8173-1616-7, 978-0-8173-1616-7, 9780817316167, , , The Great War in the Heart of Dixie, 0817354921, 0-8173-5492-1, 978-0-8173-5492-3, 9780817354923, , , The Great War in the Heart of Dixie, 081738927X, 0-8173-8927-X, 978-0-8173-8927-7, 9780817389277,

The Great War in the Heart of Dixie
Alabama During World War I
by Martin T. Olliff

Quality Paper
2008. 286 pp.
22 illustrations
978-0-8173-5492-3
Price:  $34.95 s
E Book
2015. 286 pp.
22 illustrations
978-0-8173-8927-7
Price:  $34.95 d

There has been much scholarship on how the U.S. as a nation reacted to World War I, but few have explored how Alabama responded. Did the state follow the federal government’s lead in organizing its resources or did Alabamians devise their own solutions to unique problems they faced? How did the state’s cultural institutions and government react? What changes occurred in its economy and way of life? What, if any, were the long-term consequences in Alabama? The contributors to this volume address these questions and establish a base for further investigation of the state during this era. 

Contributors:
David Alsobrook, Wilson Fallin Jr., Robert J. Jakeman, Dowe Littleton, Martin T. Olliff, Victoria E. Ott, Wesley P. Newton, Michael V. R. Thomason, Ruth Smith Truss, and Robert Saunders Jr.

 Martin T. Olliff is Director of the Archives of Wiregrass History and Culture and Assistant Professor of History, Troy University, Dothan. His articles have appeared in Essays in Business and Economic History; Alabama Review; Provenance: Journal of the Society of Georgia Archivists; and Agricultural History.

“This attractive collection of perceptive and well written essays is a significant scholarly contribution.”
 —Betty J. Brandon, editor of Southern Women: Histories and Identities

“The book captures well how Alabama citizens both black and white, confronted a War that challenged the notions of citizenship and military preparedness.”
—Colin J. Davis, author of Waterfront Revolts: New York and London Dockworkers, 1946–1961